Contents

Contents tagged: person-centred care

May 17, 2016 Europe Publication

GPCC Person-centred care research centre web site

This research centre web site contains a range of information, films, presentations, resources and links; from basic information on person-centred care to information on a wide range of individual research projects from health and elderly care and rehabilitation. It also contains news, events, scientific publications and implementation.

The Gothenburg University Centre for Person-centred Care (GPCC) is an interdisciplinary research centre, established in January 2010, with the support of the Swedish government's strategic investment in health and care research. Uniquely GPCC has evaluated the effects of person-centred care in controlled studies. This has established that person-centred care is capable of enhancing the efficiency of the care process. Apart from considerable monetary savings resulting from amongst other things shorter hospital stays, significant positive effects from a patient perspective have been seen, as care is adapted to each individual person and his or her resources are made use of.

(A summary commentary ...

May 17, 2016 Europe Publication

Partnership, Person-Centredness in Health Care

Person-centred care is an emerging concept in health care. Many people ask what is new about it, and as a matter of fact many health care professionals believe that they work in a person-centred way already. But shifting to a person-centred care practice often involves a profound change in culture and structure, and the key is a different approach in seeing the patient as a partner. The main thing is about being able to listen. Being able to listen to the patient and co-create a care plan; to create a partnership in health care.

The University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-centred Care - GPCC, performs research, education and innovation in person-centred care. Many of the centre’s projects are performed in partnership with Sahlgrenska University Hospital, one of the biggest in Europe, which is closely linked to the University via the The Sahlgrenska Academy.

This short film sets the scene by ...

May 17, 2016 Europe Publication

Person-centered care - ready for prime time

Long-term diseases are today the leading cause of mortality worldwide and are estimated to be the leading cause of disability by 2020. Person-centered care (PCC) has been shown to advance concordance between care provider and patient on treatment plans, improve health outcomes and increase patient satisfaction. Yet, despite these and other documented benefits, there are a variety of significant challenges to putting PCC into clinical practice. Although care providers today broadly acknowledge PCC to be an important part of care, in our experience we must establish routines that initiate, integrate, and safeguard PCC in daily clinical practice to ensure that PCC is systematically and consistently practiced, i.e. not just when we feel we have time for it. In this paper, we propose a few simple routines to facilitate and safeguard the transition to PCC. We believe that if conscientiously and systematically applied, they will help to make PCC the ...

May 17, 2016 Europe Publication

Health-care improvements in a financially constrained environment

Although the European Council agreed on common values such as good quality, universally accessible care in 1996, those values are now under threat. Health expenditure in all European Union (EU) countries between 1996 and 2013 increased from 7·9% to 9·5% of gross domestic product. There is a need to adapt to a financially constrained environment.

WE CARE is an EU Seventh Framework Programme consortium tasked to propose a research and development roadmap for innovative, cost-contained, quality care. The roadmap should not only consider efficacy from clinical trials but also community effectiveness, including the appropriateness of services provided.

May 17, 2016 Europe Publication

Person-centred care after acute coronary syndrome, from hospital to primary care - A randomised controlled trial

Highlights

  • Person-centred care in the recovery after an acute coronary syndrome event,
  • Details of a co-created health plan to produce a partnership between patients and health care professionals,
  • The transition of care continuing the partnership from in-hospital care to primary care,
  • Improved self-efficacy by including a partnership compared to standard care alone.

Aim

To evaluate if person-centred care can improve self-efficacy and facilitate return to work or prior activity level in patients after an event of acute coronary syndrome.

Method

199 patients with acute coronary syndrome < 75 years were randomly assigned to person-centred care intervention or treatment as usual and followed for 6 months. In the intervention group a person-centred care process was added to treatment as usual, emphasising the patient as a partner in care. Care was co-created in collaboration between patients, physicians, registered nurses and other health care professionals and documented in a health plan. A team-based partnership ...

May 17, 2016 Europe Publication

Patient-centred resistance exercise improves muscle strength, health status and pain intensity in fibromyalgia—a randomized controlled trial

Introduction

Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by persistent widespread pain, increased pain sensitivity and tenderness. Muscle strength in women with FM is reduced compared to healthy women. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program on muscle strength, health status, and current pain intensity in women with FM.

Methods

A total of 130 women with FM (age 22–64 years, symptom duration 0–35 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multi-center trial examining the effects of progressive resistance group exercise compared with an active control group. A person-centred model of exercise was used to support the participants’ self-confidence for management of exercise because of known risks of activity-induced pain in FM. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks and was supervised by experienced physiotherapists. Primary outcome measure was isometric knee-extension force (Steve Strong®), secondary outcome measures were health ...

May 16, 2016 Africa, Europe Publication

Voices on person-centred care

What is person-centred care to a patient, a physician, a nurse, a hospital head of department, an industry representative and a researcher? How do these people, who all have experience of receiving or working with person-centred care, see person-centred care from their perspectives? Short film clips from the University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-centred Care - GPCC. GPCC is an in terdisciplinary research centre, established in January 2010, with the support of the Swedish government's strategic investment in health and care research. Uniquely GPCC has evaluated the effects of person-centred care in controlled studies. This has established that person-centred care is capable of enhancing the efficiency of the care process. Apart from considerable monetary savings resulting from amongst other things shorter hospital stays, significant positive effects from a patient perspective have been seen, as care is adapted to each individual person and his or her resources are made use of.

Feb. 29, 2016 Global Publication

The Users’ Perspective: What Integrated Care should look like

At the International Conference on Integrated Care 2014, Robert Johnstone, Trustee of the International Alliance of Patients’ Organisations, gave a talk titled "The Users’ Perspective: What Integrated Care should look like". Having had chronic rheumatoid arthritis since the age of three, he shared his personal story of moving away from being “a very passive recipient of care” to becoming "a self-managing patient”. When he was about fourteen years old, he told his rheumatologist that eating acidic food seemed to make his pain worse. The rheumatologist replied that this was not possible, so because he trusted his doctor he kept eating acidic food and feeling pain. Later in his life, he progressively learned to listen to his own body and to work out what was good and what was bad for him. He gradually reduced his use of medications until he stopped taking them completely while using complementary therapies and focusing ...

Feb. 7, 2016 Europe Publication

I’m Still Me: A Narrative For Coordinated Support For Older People

Care coordination should be a means to achieving specific outcomes, rather than an end in itself. In turn, it is important that these outcomes reflect what patients want. In December 2014, National Voices, Age UK and UCLPartners jointly published I’m Still Me, a document that focuses on what older people consider to be the most important outcomes of coordinated support. The report is based on a variety of research methods, including 74 semi-structured interviews with older individuals. The research identifies a number of outcomes which are key to older people, such as maintaining their independence and retaining their own choice in decision making. I’m Still Me also includes a series of ‘I statements’ that summarise what older people have said they want their support to look like. For example: "I am supported to be independent"; “I can do activities that are important to me”; “I can maintain social ...

Jan. 19, 2016 Global Publication

Person-centred Care Around the World

This directory of person-centred care organisations around the world was produced as part of an international environment scan of the field of person-centred care undertaken by Health Policy Partnership. This useful tool highlights the leading international centres working on similar aspects of person-centred care to the Health Foundation. The tool can help to identify person-centred care research, measurement and implementation ‘hot spots’ in different settings globally. The tool enables collaboration between those working on person-centred care by providing key information on the type of work being undertaken on person-centred care. Please share this tool with contacts and colleagues to encourage greater collaboration.