IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: complexity

June 15, 2021 Europe Publication

Applying Complexity Theory to a Hospital Complex Patient Care Program

Increasingly, complexity science concepts are informing health care design and practice. The present paper describes the implementation of early complexity science principles in a Complex Care Program with the aim of strengthening the provision of integrated care. Grounded in cybernetic network theory, Stafford Beer’s Viable Systems Model provided the guiding principles for the program’s redesign. The Viable Systems Model with its broadly applicable principles, is now the conceptual model of information management in the program. Beer’s framework has enabled a relatively small number of clinicians to coordinate care for a large cohort of patients with significant clinical complexity, and a multitude of providers, in the community setting.

June 1, 2021 Global Publication

Exploring the Quality Paradigms in Integrated Care: The Need for Emergence and Reflection

There are four quality paradigms, of which the Empirical and Reference paradigm fit best in stable circumstances, and the Reflective and Emergence paradigms, which fit best in unstable circumstances.

This study aims to explore the use of the four quality paradigms in integrated care, and to shed light on the different paradigmatic commitments and different perspectives on quality.

Jan. 12, 2021 Western Pacific Publication

Integrating patient complexity into health policy: a conceptual framework

Clinicians across all health professions increasingly strive to add value to the care they deliver through the application of the central tenets of people-centred care (PCC), namely the ‘right care’, in the ‘right place’, at the ‘right time’ and ‘tailored to the needs of communities’.

This ideal is being hampered by a lack of a structured, evidence-based means to formulate policy and value the commissioning of services in an environment of increasing appreciation for the complex health needs of communities. This creates significant challenges for policy makers, commissioners and providers of health services. Communities face a complex intersection of challenges when engaging with healthcare. Increasingly, complexity is gaining prominence as a significant factor in the delivery of PCC.

Based on the World Health Organization (WHO) components of health policy, this paper proposes a policy framework that enables policy makers, commissioners and providers of health care to integrate a model of ...

Nov. 14, 2020 Europe Publication

Towards an Integrated Care Organisation from a CEO Perspective

Many experimental projects towards Person-Centred Care (PCC) are successful in the early stages, but founder when the attempt is made to scale them up to encompass the whole organisation. This case study therefore focusses on one manager’s attempts to extend the successes of a preliminary project ‘Etxean Ondo’ that aimed to provide adequate support for the elderly living at home or in nursing homes, as well as for their families and care professionals. Through in-depth interviews with stakeholders, this qualitative study, based on Grounded Theory, sets out to analyse which behaviours, attitudes and values on the part of management appeared to favour full-integration of PCC in this wider context. Analysis of the data gathered allowed the researcher to generate an experimental case model which suggests how the extrinsic, intrinsic and transcendent motivation of stakeholders can be aligned with the goals of upper management to promote full-integration of PCC in ...

Nov. 14, 2020 Global Publication

Research in Integrated Care: The Need for More Emergent, People-Centred Approaches

The International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC) recently celebrated its 20th International Conference (ICIC20) through a virtual event that brought together patients and carers, academics, care professionals, NGOs, policy-makers and industry partners from across the global integrated care community. The International Journal for Integrated Care (IJIC) used this opportunity to host a workshop on published research in integrated care, specifically to reflect on the quality of existing scientific enquiry. A lively discussion on the current state of integrated care research concluded that there remained significant shortcomings to current methodologies – for example, in their ability to provide the depth of understanding required to support the knowledge needed to best inform policy and practice, particularly when addressing people-centredness. In part, the debate recognized how the nature of existing research funding, and prevailing attitudes and preferences towards certain research methodologies, were partly to blame (as has been noted by IJIC previously). The ...

Oct. 30, 2020 Global Publication

Research in Integrated Care: The Need for More Emergent, People-Centred Approaches

The International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC) recently celebrated its 20th International Conference (ICIC20) through a virtual event that brought together patients and carers, academics, care professionals, NGOs, policy-makers and industry partners from across the global integrated care community.

The International Journal for Integrated Care (IJIC) used this opportunity to host a workshop on published research in integrated care, specifically to reflect on the quality of existing scientific enquiry. A lively discussion on the current state of integrated care research concluded that there remained significant shortcomings to current methodologies – for example, in their ability to provide the depth of understanding required to support the knowledge needed to best inform policy and practice, particularly when addressing people-centredness.

In part, the debate recognized how the nature of existing research funding, and prevailing attitudes and preferences towards certain research methodologies, were partly to blame (as has been noted by IJIC previously. The ...

Nov. 25, 2019 Western Pacific Publication

Families as Partners: Co-design of a localised model of care for children with medical complexity living in rural Australia and evaluation using the Paediatric Integrated Care Survey (PICS)

The number of children with medical complexity (CMC) residing in regional Australia is growing, challenging the health system to provide equitable care. Families of CMC experience problems in accessing appropriate care locally and they have high out-of-pocket costs and family disruptions because of long travel distances to access care in metropolitan paediatric hospitals.  The Murrumbidgee Local Health District (MLHD) in collaboration with the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network (SCHN) partnered with families and local services to co-design a Model of Care (MoC) which better reflects the needs of CMC, their families and local services. The MoC was co-designed with families, local healthcare providers and the tertiary paediatric network.

Sept. 15, 2019 Europe Publication

Improving Integrated Care: Can Implementation Science Unlock the ‘Black Box’ of Complexities?

In a previous IJIC editorial they reflected on the fact that we have yet to make any significant breakthrough to understand the implementation and sustainability of complex service innovations that so characterise the development of integrated care programmes [1]. Without such knowledge we might be able to explain the core building blocks of integrated care systems, but we cannot adequately explain the intricacies of effective implementation nor fully understand the causes of the outcomes we observe. This article show how this is not simply a methodological problem but reflects a more deep-rooted challenge in the lack of value that is placed both in the commissioning of such research and the findings that are produced.

July 28, 2016 Global Publication

Understanding integrated care: a complex process, a fundamental principle

Recent Editorial in the International Journal on Integrated Care, written by Nick Goodwin, emphasising the importance of the Framework. Around the past year Nick Goodwin has been involved in a range of research and development activities that seek to understand and/or promote the successful adoption of integrated care. In each of these, a common opening statement from protagonists is to typically say that “there is no universally accepted definition of integrated care, no one model of care that can be replicated locally, and little evidence to tell us that it works”. Whilst the latter might be disputed it remains true that people struggle with what integrated care means and particularly how it can be applied.

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