IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: organizational change

Oct. 10, 2019 Global Publication

Integrated care for healthcare sustainability for patients living with rare diseases

The increasingly complex and multidimensional care request, combined with the presence of increasingly aware and demanding patients, accentuates the need for new strategies to preserve health systems economic sustainability. Therefore, integration mechanisms reveal an essential condition for ensuring continuity of care. The paper reviews the main literature available on the integration of heal services and relates it to rare diseases.

The literature identifies several system levers for the effective design and implementation of integrated care frameworks, namely: political support and commitment, governance, stakeholder engagement, organisational change, leadership, collaboration and trust, workforce education and training, patient empowerment, financing and incentives, ICT infrastructure and solutions, monitoring and evaluation system.

Sept. 5, 2017 Global Publication

Revisiting Organisational Learning in Integrated Care

Progress in health care integration is largely linked to changes in processes and ways of doing. These changes have knowledge management and learning implications. For this reason, the use of the concept of organisational learning is explored in the field of integrated care. 

Feb. 23, 2017 Global Publication

The Digital House of Care: Information solutions for integrated care

This paper draws on the recent experience of achieving large-scale data integration accross the boundaries of health and social care, to help plan and commission services more effectively. The purpose is to describe the development of a digital tool in an English county stiving towards a vision of integrated information that is used to underpin and increasingly integrated future of health and social care delivery. 

Sept. 22, 2016 Europe Practice

Integrating health and social care in Highland, Scotland

A lead organization model was introduced in Highland to promote greater integration between health care and social services. This new management structure united previously fragmented professional groups, serving to streamline service delivery and improve working relationships; broad political support for integrated care created a favourable environment for change; strong support from local senior management drove the initiative forward; extensive local engagement across all care levels ensured widespread buy-in for the initiative and reduced resistance to change across stakeholder groups; design and implementation of the initiative was iterative and not every detail was worked out prior to its launch; leaders stressed the need for “balance between diligence and good enough”.

Sept. 7, 2016 Europe Practice

Pioneering integrated organizational models for improving elderly people’s care in Ängelholm, Sweden

A new integrated care organization (Hälsostaden) was established to merge primary and hospital care with elderly and social care. Hälsostaden is jointly managed by its regional and municipal government and employs 600 professionals across health and social sectors; early investments in stakeholder relationships and trust building were essential for securing the future of the initiative and developing a foundation based on teamwork; finding the uniting objective of improving care for elderly people enabled stakeholders to move forward with planning; contextualizing the initiative within emerging political priorities helped generate political support and secure the necessary legal frameworks; identifying individual organizational strengths and pooling resources minimized required investments and supported in-house initiatives.

May 26, 2016 Global Publication

Understanding pressures in general practice

“General practice is in crisis”; that is how this King’s Fund report start its analysis, pointing to funding and workforce as two of the main problems in general practice situation. Increasing needs and complexity, trends of moving patients from hospital to communities and rising expectations in population act as factors that increase pressures in general practice.

This report identifies some immediate priorities and some future challenges in order to protect general practice and to make it can face future needs.

Immediate priorities would be: (I) providing practical support to practices, (II) accelerating the uptake of technologies that can help practice deal with growing pressures more effectively, (III) encouraging reshaping of workforce in primary care, (IV) reducing bureaucratic burdens, (V) placing primary care at the heart of sustainability and transformation plans, (VI) supporting patients to use health services appropriately.
Long-term challenges pointed by this report are: (I) solving deficiencies in ...

May 26, 2016 Europe Publication

Reshaping the workforce to deliver the care patients need

Workforce structure is one of the most difficult things to modulate in health systems. Current transition to new models of care could be a good opportunity to make workforce structure match actual needs of systems and populations. In this report, published by the Nuffield Trust, it is analyzed how organizations could reshape their current workforce and what the benefits would be:

There is a need to evolve from an illness-based system to a patient-centred system.
Workforce should meet future needs by incorporating professionals with a vision aligned with future models of care.
There are opportunities to develop the current workforce at all grades: from redeploying support staff, extending the skills of registered professionals and training advanced practitioners.
There is good evidence that support workers can provide good-quality, patient-focused care as well as reduce the workload of more highly qualified staff. Investment here could provide a cost-effective and rapid solution to ...

May 26, 2016 Europe Publication

Developing care for a changing population: Learning from GP-led organisations

The way a health system is organized may influence the care this system provides. In this Nuffield Trust report some GP-led experiences are described, analyzing what are the internal characteristics and external context that have affected GP-led progress.

The intra-organizational characteristics listed are: (I) strong links between clinical leaders and GP member practices, (II) sophisticated strategic and operational management support, (III) use of multiple forms of peer-led improvement, (IV) organizations are both entrepeneurial and pragmatic, (V) linked data between the organization’s own services and other providers.

In what concerns to external context, the three characteristics listed are: (I) a receptive context for change, (II) capability to transfer some of the commissioner role to providers through capitated budgets, (III) slow pace and short-term nature of decision-making.

The slow pace and short-term nature of decision-making in clinical commissioning groups may drive emerging organisations to focus on service developments outside of their ...

May 23, 2016 Europe Practice

Disparity reduction strategy in Israel’s Clalit Health Services

Creation of a composite disparity score allowed health disparities in Clalit Health Services to be identified, assessed and then targeted for intervention; top-down leadership from senior management within Clalit Health Services was essential for creating the conditions needed for change; locally-designed initiatives provided tailored solutions for achieving targets set by senior management; capitalizing on preexisting strengths and resources minimized the need for costly investments; data-driven performance measures were the backbone of the initiative and provided evidence of the need for intervention, helped incentivize performance improvements and allowed monitoring and evaluation of progress; regular feedback and monitoring fostered a culture of continuous learning and evidence-based performance improvement.