IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: financial sustainability

Jan. 19, 2017 Europe Publication

Systems, not structures: Changing Health & Social Care

In his speech of 4 November 2015, the then Minister for Health, Simon Hamilton MLA, announced that in response to recommendation 1 of The Right Time, The Right Place report by Sir Liam Donaldson, he would appoint an expert, clinically led panel to consider and lead an informed debate on the best configuration of Health and Social Care services in NI.

The Panel was appointed in January 2016 and comprised local and international members.

PANEL MEMBERS

Professor Rafael Bengoa (Chair)
Dr Alan Stout
Bronagh Scott
Mairead McAlinden
Mr Mark A Taylor

EXPERT ADVICE ON SOCIAL CARE WAS PROVIDED BY:

Sean Holland
Fionnuala McAndrew

THE PANEL WAS SUPPORTED IN ITS WORK BY:

Alastair Campbell
Vikki Greenwood
Catherine Tumelty

Feb. 17, 2022 Europe, Global Publication

Introducing The Lancet Global Health Commission on financing primary health care: putting people at the centre

 
Primary health care (PHC) is an essential component of high-performing health systems, delivering effective, affordable, and inclusive care to people when they need it, and providing the foundation for both universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals. As the platform for providing basic health services and essential public health functions, and for responding to the ongoing challenges of infectious disease and to the rapidly expanding burden of chronic conditions, PHC has a commitment to equity and social justice. Policymakers worldwide are seeking to strengthen their primary care systems to secure the health of their populations across the lifecourse.
 
 
Despite the calls to action in the Declarations of Alma Ata (1978) and Astana (2018), PHC is failing to meet the needs of the people—users, providers, and communities—who should be firmly at its centre. Resources that are destined for PHC often do not reach frontline providers. Services are often ...

March 24, 2022 Global Publication

Benefit design: the perspective from health financing policy

Given the central importance of public financing to make progress towards universal health coverage (UHC), government policy on benefit design, including both service entitlements and conditions of access, significantly influences health system performance. Benefit design considers how all public funds are used and should be based on evidence and developed through a systematic process involving key stakeholders. Reducing uncertainty over entitlements and conditions of access, in particular co-payments, both reduces barriers to accessing services and improves financial protection. Finally, aligning benefit design with a range of health financing policies, as well as service with delivery objectives, provides a powerful way through which policy makers can drive positive change in their health systems.

Download document

April 5, 2022 Global Publication

The Lancet Global Health Commission on financing primary health care: putting people at the centre

Executive summary

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought the need for well-functioning primary health care (PHC) into sharp focus. PHC is the best platform for providing basic health interventions (including effective management of non-communicable diseases) and essential public health functions. PHC is widely recognised as a key component of all high-performing health systems and is an essential foundation of universal health coverage.
PHC was famously set as a global priority in the 1978 Alma-Ata Declaration. More recently, the 2018 Astana Declaration on PHC made a similar call for universal coverage of basic health care across the life cycle, as well as essential public health functions, community engagement, and a multisectoral approach to health. Yet in most low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), PHC is not delivering on the promises of these declarations. In many places across the globe, PHC does not meet the needs of the people—including both users and providers ...