IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: systematic review

April 17, 2020 Global Publication

What do the healthcare experiences of people with long-term conditions tell us about person-centred care? A systematic review.

Growing numbers of people now live with long term conditions. For each person, the challenges are multiple and unique to that individual. In recognition of this, health policy places greater emphasis on the delivery of person-centred care (PCC). However, patients report declining levels of such care. One reason for this may be a mismatch between patient and professional/policy understanding of PCC. PCC does not depend on the efforts of the clinician alone, but results from a collaboration with the patient and needs to be enabled by the wider organisational and educational systems.

July 18, 2019 Global Publication

Clinical leadership and integrated primary care: A systematic literature review

As numbers of chronically ill patients with complex healthcare needs are increasing, primary care professionals will be challenged to deliver integrated care. Integrated care is about ‘delivering seamless care for patients with complex long-term problems cutting across multiple services, providers and settings.
Leaders are needed to address healthcare changes essential for implementation of integrated primary care. What kind of leadership this needs, which professionals should fulfil this role and how these leaders can be supported remains unclear.

June 20, 2019 Europe Publication

Implications of interprofessional primary care team characteristics for health services and patient health outcomes: A systematic review with narrative synthesis

Interprofessional primary care (IPPC) teams are promoted as an alternative to single profession physician practices in primary care with focus on preventive care and chronic disease management. Characteristics of teams can have an impact on their performance.

However, the empirical evidence of the implications of IPPC team design on various aspects of care processes or health outcomes is specific to particular contexts, but a general understanding of optimal team design is not available.

May 31, 2019 Europe Publication

Implications of interprofessional primary care team characteristics for health services and patient health outcomes: A systematic review with narrative synthesis

Interprofessional primary care (IPPC) teams are promoted as an alternative to single profession physician practices in primary care with focus on preventive care and chronic disease management. Characteristics of teams can have an impact on their performance.

Literature focused on the implications of team characteristics on team processes, such as teamwork, collaboration, or satisfaction of patients or providers. Despite heterogeneity of contexts, some trends are observable: shared space, common vision and goals, clear definitions of roles, and leadership as important to good teamwork. The impacts of these on health care outputs or patient health are not clear. So, this systematic review of extant evidence on the characteristics of interprofessional primary care teams can inform policy

May 22, 2019 Europe Publication

Development of the ACTIVE framework to describe stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews

Involvement of patients, health professionals, and the wider public (‘stakeholders’) is seen to be beneficial to the quality, relevance and impact of research and may enhance the usefulness and uptake of systematic reviews. However, there is a lack of evidence and resources to guide researchers in how to actively involve stakeholders in systematic reviews. In this paper, we report the development of the ACTIVE framework to describe how stakeholders are involved in systematic reviews

Sept. 15, 2018 Americas Publication

Person-Centered Integrated Care for Chronic Kidney Disease

The effectiveness of person-centered integrated care strategies for CKD is uncertain. This study conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials to assess the effect of person-centered integrated care for CKD.
It searched MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (from inception to April of 2016), and selected randomized, controlled trials of person-centered integrated care interventions with a minimum follow-up of 3 months. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to assess the effect of person-centered integrated care.

May 16, 2018 Africa Publication

The impact of cash transfers on social determinants of health and health inequalities in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

Cash transfers (CTs) are now high on the agenda of most governments in low-and middle- income countries. Within the field of health promotion, CTs constitute a healthy public policy initiative as they have the potential to address the social determinants of health and health inequalities. A systematic review was conducted to synthesise the evidence on CTs´impacts on social determinants of health and health inequalities in sub-Saharan Africa, and to identify the barriers and facilitators of effective CTs.

Nov. 16, 2017 Europe Publication

Can chronic disease be managed through integrated care cost-effectively? Evidence from a systematic review.

The increase in demand for integrated care models to manage chronic disease is a challenge for the Irish health system, which is traditionally organised around the acute hospital services. Implementing integrated care programmes requires significant investment, and thus, their economic impact requires consideration.

AIMS:This paper updates the previous evidence on the cost-effectiveness of integrated care programmes to support the development of a cost-effective integrated care programme for chronic disease management.


METHODS: A systematic review of economic evaluations of integrated care programmes for chronic diseases (respiratory, cardiovascular, diabetes and musculoskeletal diseases) was performed using methods guided by the principles of conducting systematic reviews. The evidence was combined and summarised using a narrative synthesis. A meta-analysis of the evidence was not performed due to the heterogeneity of interventions and associated outcomes.


RESULTS: Six studies met the inclusion criteria; no study considered an integrated model of care that dealt with more than ...

Nov. 6, 2017 Global Publication

Instruments Measuring Integrated Care: A Systematic Review of Measurement Properties

Integrated care is an important strategy for increasing health system performance. Despite ots growing significance, detailed evidence on the measurement properties of integrated care instruments remains vague and limited. This systematic review aims to provide evidence on the state of the art in measuring integrated care. 

July 25, 2017 Europe Publication

The degree of integration of non-dispensing pharmacists in primary care practice and the impact on health outcomes: A systematic review

A non-dispensing pharmacist conducts clinical pharmacy services aimed at optimizing patients individual pharmacotherapy. Embedding a non-dispensing pharmacist in primary care practice enables collaboration, probably enhancing patient care. The degree of integration of non-dispending pharmacists into multidisciplinary health care teams varies strongly between settings. The degree of integration may be a determinant for its success. This study investigates how the degree of integration of a non-dispensing pharmacist impacts medication related health outcomes in primary care. 

April 26, 2016 Americas, Europe, Western Pacific Publication

Integrating funds for health and social care: an evidence review

Objectives

Integrated funds for health and social care are one possible way of improving care for people with complex care requirements. If integrated funds facilitate coordinated care, this could support improvements in patient experience, and health and social care outcomes, reduce avoidable hospital admissions and delayed discharges, and so reduce costs. In this article, we examine whether this potential has been realized in practice.

Methods

We propose a framework based on agency theory for understanding the role that integrated funding can play in promoting coordinated care, and review the evidence to see whether the expected effects are realized in practice. We searched eight electronic databases and relevant websites, and checked reference lists of reviews and empirical studies. We extracted data on the types of funding integration used by schemes, their benefits and costs (including unintended effects), and the barriers to implementation. We interpreted our findings with reference to our framework ...

March 2, 2016 Global Publication

How stakeholder participation can contribute to systematic reviews of complex interventions

Although patient and public involvement in research is a requirement for research funding in many countries, the knowledge base for how to effectively involve people —and evidence of the effectiveness of involvement—is weak. This article describes how methods used in participatory health research were used to involve patients, clients, providers and community health workers across all stages of a realist review. Sustained involvement enabled better identification of the components of the complex intervention of communitybased peer support. It also challenged assumptions of how peer support is constructed, leading the review team to question whether the process of designing and implementing interventions has more influence on effectiveness than previously recognised in empirical studies. We conclude with a discussion on when sustained involvement should be used, and the challenges of incorporating it into the traditional researcher-led approach to systematic reviews.