IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: integrated care models

Nov. 26, 2019 Americas Publication

Should community pharmacy be 'linked'? The perceptions of including community pharmacy in an integrated care model in Ontario, Canada

Integrated care models are becoming more frequent in various health systems to provide quality coordinated care, with the aim of improving patient outcomes and costs. Many patients under an integrated care model present with complex health and social needs requiring more sophisticated care coordination. 

Feb. 1, 2019 Global Publication

Why integrated care already owns the future

Integrated care has certainly arrived in the primary care clinic. Evidence and momentum began building 20 years ago with the demonstrated effectiveness of collaborative care programs for depression and anxiety disorders in primary care. Since then, various forms of integrated care have been repeatedly proven effective across a range of care settings, patient populations, languages and cultures.

Integrated care models are well adapted to thrive during the Fourth Industrial Revolution in health care. Because integrated care has embraced flexibility and disruption, integrated care models will succeed—or even dominate—in a future that will demand flexibility.

Oct. 19, 2017 Europe Publication

Conducting a Health Needs Assessment to Identify Potentials for Population-based Integrated Care Models in Socially Deprived Urban Regions – The Example of the Integrated Care Project “Billstedt-Horn” in Hamburg, Germany

Against the background of regional differences in morbidity and social determinants of health small-scale health services research is becoming increasingly relevant, particularly for planners of population-based integrated care models. Despite of longstanding research of regional variation especially by John Wennberg neither are there scientifically or practically accepted standards on how to identify regions which are in a special need for integrating health services nor is there a precisely defined set of methods which could be used to identify and prioritize problems in health services delivery.