IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: health professionals

May 20, 2020 Global Publication

Universal access to essential health information: accelerating progress towards universal health coverage and other SDG health targets

The information that people need to protect and manage their own health and the health of those for whom they are responsible is a fundamental element of an effective people-centred healthcare system. Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) requires universal access to essential health information. While it was recently recognised by the World Medical Association, universal access to essential health information is not yet reflected in official monitoring of progress on UHC for the sustainable development goals (SDGs). In this paper, we outline key features that characterise universal access to essential health information and indicate how it is increasingly achievable. 

April 2, 2020 Europe Publication

Sharing responsibility: municipal health professionals’ approaches to goal setting with older patients with multi-morbidity – a grounded theory study

Recent health policy promoting integrated care emphasizes to increase patients’ health, experience of quality of care and reduce care utilization. Thus, health service delivery should be co-produced by health professionals and individual patients with multiple diseases and complex needs. Collaborative goal setting is a new procedure for older patients with multi-morbidity. The aim is to explore municipal health professionals’ experiences of collaborative goal setting with patients with multi-morbidity aged 80 and above.

Dec. 12, 2019 Europe Publication

Unknown makes unloved—A case study on improving integrated health and social care in the Netherlands using a participatory approach

Many initiatives integrating health and social care have been implemented in order to provide adequate care and support to older people living at home. Further development of existing initiatives requires iterative processes of developing, implementing and evaluating improvements to current practice. This case study provides insight into the process of improving an existing integrated care initiative in the Netherlands. Using a participatory approach, researchers and local stakeholders collaborated to develop and implement activities to further improve collaboration between health and social care professionals. Improvement activities included interprofessional meetings focussing on reflection and mutual learning and workplace visits. Researchers evaluated the improvement process, using data triangulation of multiple qualitative and quantitative data sources. 

May 22, 2019 Europe Publication

Development of the ACTIVE framework to describe stakeholder involvement in systematic reviews

Involvement of patients, health professionals, and the wider public (‘stakeholders’) is seen to be beneficial to the quality, relevance and impact of research and may enhance the usefulness and uptake of systematic reviews. However, there is a lack of evidence and resources to guide researchers in how to actively involve stakeholders in systematic reviews. In this paper, we report the development of the ACTIVE framework to describe how stakeholders are involved in systematic reviews

Dec. 12, 2017 Europe Publication

The Joint Action on Health Workforce Planning and Forecasting: Results of a European programme to improve health workforce policie

Health workforce (HWF) planning and forecasting is faced with a number of challenges, most notably a lack of consistent terminology, a lack of data, limited model, demand based, and future-based planning and limited inter-country collaboration. The Joint Action on Health Workforce Planning and Forecsting (JAHWF, 2013-2016) aimed to move foward on the HWF planning process and support countries in tackling the key challenges facing the HWF and HWF planning. This paper synthesizes and discusses the results of the JAHWF. Ti is shown that the JAHWFhas provided importatn setps towards improved HWF planning and forecasting across Europe. 

July 7, 2017 Global Publication

WHO: What is people-centred care?

Globally, 1 in 20 people still lacks access to essential health services that could be delivered at a local clinic instead of a hospital. And where services are accessible, they are often fragmented and of poor quality. WHO is supporting countries to progress towards universal health coverage by designing health systems around the needs of people instead of diseases and health institutions, so that everyone gets the right care, at the right time, in the right place.

July 7, 2017 Global Multimedia

WHO: What is people-centred care?

Globally, 1 in 20 people still lacks access to essential health services that could be delivered at a local clinic instead of a hospital. And where services are accessible, they are often fragmented and of poor quality. WHO is supporting countries to progress towards universal health coverage by designing health systems around the needs of people instead of diseases and health institutions, so that everyone gets the right care, at the right time, in the right place.