IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: payment systems

Dec. 4, 2020 Global Event

21st International Conference on Integrated Care (ICIC21)

In 2021 the 21st International Conference on Integrated Care (ICIC21) “Realising the true value of Integrated Care” will be run as a virtual conference, co-hosted with our hubs and collaborative centres IFIC Scotland, IFIC Australia, IFIC Ireland, IFIC Canada and IFIC Latin America. We have received a huge volume of feedback from our ICIC20 conference which took place in September and based on those suggestions we will be amending how the programme is designed and accessed to best suit a virtual format. The main change from ICIC20 is that the conference will run across the whole month of May limited to 4 hour sessions taking place across various time zones.

Presenters will once again be asked to pre-record their content, however in this conference we will make those recordings available to delegates to access in their own time and will be posted to our Knowledge Tree after the conference to ...

July 3, 2018 Americas, Western Pacific Publication

Lessons for achieving health equity comparing Aotearoa/New Zealand and the United States

Aotearoa/New Zealand (Aotearoa/NZ) and the United States (U.S.) suffer inequities in health outcomes by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. This paper compares both countries’ approaches to health equity to inform policy efforts. They developed a conceptual model that highlights how government and private policies influence health equity by impacting the healthcare system (access to care, structure and quality of care, payment of care), and integration of healthcare system with social services

Jan. 23, 2018 Americas Publication

Towards Patient-Centered Conflicts of Interest Policy

Financial conflicts of interest exist between industry and physicians, and these relationships have the power to incluence physicians´medical practice. Transparency about conflicts matters for ensuring adequate informed consent, controlling healthcare expenditure, and encouraging physicians´reflection on professionalism. The US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) launched the Open Payments Program (OPP) to publicly disclose and bring transparency to the relationships between industry and physicians in the United States. These changes considerably improve transparency and the utility of available data, and caan furthermore enhance professionalism and accountability by encouraging physicians to reflect more actively on their own practices. 

May 25, 2016 Europe Publication

Exploring payment schemes used to promote integrated chronic care in Europe

The rising burden of chronic conditions has led several European countries to reform healthcare payment schemes. This paper aimed to explore the adoption and success of payment schemes that promote integration of chronic care in European countries. A literature review was used to identify European countries that employed pay-for-coordination (PFC), pay-for-performance (PFP), and bundled payment schemes. Existing evidence from the literature was supplemented with fifteen interviews with chronic care experts in these countries to obtain detailed information regarding the payment schemes, facilitators and barriers to their implementation, and their perceived success.

Austria, France, England, the Netherlands, and Germany have implemented payment schemes that were specifically designed to promote the integration of chronic care. Prominent factors facilitating implementation included stakeholder cooperation, adequate financial incentives for stakeholders, and flexible task allocation among different care provider disciplines. Common barriers to implementation included misaligned incentives across stakeholders and gaming. The implemented payment schemes targeted ...

April 26, 2016 Americas, Europe, Western Pacific Publication

Integrating funds for health and social care: an evidence review

Objectives

Integrated funds for health and social care are one possible way of improving care for people with complex care requirements. If integrated funds facilitate coordinated care, this could support improvements in patient experience, and health and social care outcomes, reduce avoidable hospital admissions and delayed discharges, and so reduce costs. In this article, we examine whether this potential has been realized in practice.

Methods

We propose a framework based on agency theory for understanding the role that integrated funding can play in promoting coordinated care, and review the evidence to see whether the expected effects are realized in practice. We searched eight electronic databases and relevant websites, and checked reference lists of reviews and empirical studies. We extracted data on the types of funding integration used by schemes, their benefits and costs (including unintended effects), and the barriers to implementation. We interpreted our findings with reference to our framework ...