IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

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Contents tagged: patient engagement leadership

March 19, 2019 Global Publication

The role of patient value and patient-centred care in health systems

Patient-centred care, with its emphasis on patient value, is a widespread health system goal. To examine the progress of the evolution towards more patient-centred health care and draw lesson for the future, the Economist Intelligence Unit conducted a survey and interviews on patient representatives, a cohort in which IAPO was present. However, the findings show that despite some progress, especially in Europe and the US, in practice such care often remains more aspiration than reality.

Oct. 22, 2018 Europe Publication

Patient vs. Community Engagement: Emerging Issues

The value proposition of including patients at each step of the research process is that patient perspectives and preferences can have a positive impact on both the science and the outcomes of comparative effectiveness research. How to accomplish engagement and the extent to which approaches to community engagement inform strategies for effective engagement need to be examined to address conducting and accelerating comparative effectiveness research.
The objective was to examine how various perspectives and diverse training lead investigators and patients to conflicting positions on how best to advance engagement.

June 30, 2016 Americas, Global Publication

CMMI’s New Comprehensive Primary Care Plus: Its Promise And Missed Opportunities

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) has recently announced an initiative called Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+), evolved from the previous Comprehensive Primary Care (CPP) initiative. The initiative mainly consists on paying a fee to those primary care practices willing to introduce organizational changes centered in five primary care functions:  (1) access and continuity; (2) care management; (3) comprehensiveness and coordination; (4) patient and caregiver engagement; and, (5) planned care and population health.

 

In this post, the authors outline some of the promises and downsides of the PCC+. On the bright side, the authors analyse how financial incentives can make primary care practices introduce innovations that may lead to improvements in the quality of their clinical performance. On the other side, two main downsides are mentioned: (I) the lack of incentives to achieve good results in the care that takes place beyond the primary care services -hospital admissions ...

Feb. 9, 2016 Americas Publication

Partnering with patients to improve care: essential skills and strategies.

This link provides the contents from the conference organized by the McGill University Health Centre’s Institute for Strategic Analysis and Innovation (MUHC-ISAI), regarding patient centered health care systems.

The opening conference was performed by Angela Coulter, who reviewed the patient engagement history in health care systems and gave a broad overview on how patients could be involved in the entire functioning of the system.

In the website there can also be found the materials corresponding to the following six sessions:

  • Patient engagement leadership.
  • Patient partnership: recruitment, training, governance and evaluation.
  • How does the patient experience drive improvement?
  • Building capacity to lead quality improvement with patient partners.
  • Engaging patients to improve the clinical encounter.
  • Patient engagement in patient safety.

With these materials, the MUHC-ISAI shares an important amount of information and resources in order to improve the role of patients in current health systems.

Feb. 9, 2016 Americas Multimedia

Partnering with patients to improve care: essential skills and strategies.

This link provides the contents from the conference organized by the McGill University Health Centre’s Institute for Strategic Analysis and Innovation (MUHC-ISAI), regarding patient centered health care systems.

The opening conference was performed by Angela Coulter, who reviewed the patient engagement history in health care systems and gave a broad overview on how patients could be involved in the entire functioning of the system.

In the website there can also be found the materials corresponding to the following six sessions:

  • Patient engagement leadership.
  • Patient partnership: recruitment, training, governance and evaluation.
  • How does the patient experience drive improvement?
  • Building capacity to lead quality improvement with patient partners.
  • Engaging patients to improve the clinical encounter.
  • Patient engagement in patient safety.

With these materials, the MUHC-ISAI shares an important amount of information and resources in order to improve the role of patients in current health systems.