IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: noncommunicable diseases

Oct. 11, 2016 Europe Practice

Strengthening disease prevention services in Albania

The government, which was strongly committed to establishing universal health coverage, launched a four-year Free Check-Up Programme to introduce free screening services for chronic conditions; adopting a proactive approach to prevention was essential for reaching and engaging the target population (all citizens aged between 40 to 65 years); significant efforts were made to improve the systematic collection and monitoring of population health data; government support for activities, and a key partnership with the Health Insurance Institution to reimburse health check-up services, helped embed the initiative into the health system.

June 16, 2020 South-East Asia Publication

A narrative review of gaps in the provision of integrated care for noncommunicable diseases in India

Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) account for a higher burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCD) and home to a higher number of premature deaths (before age 70) from NCDs. NCDs have become an integral part of the global development agenda. This paper reinforces the need for an integrated comprehensive model of NCD care especially at primary health care level to address the growing burden of these diseases.

Nov. 15, 2021 Africa Publication

Integrating diabetes, hypertension and HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa: a Delphi consensus study on international best practice

Although HIV continues to have a high prevalence among adults in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCD) such as diabetes and hypertension is increasing rapidly. There is an urgent need to expand the capacity of healthcare systems in SSA to provide NCD services and scale up existing chronic care management pathways. This study highlights the outcomes which may form key components of future complex interventions to define a model of integrated healthcare delivery for diabetes, hypertension and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

April 7, 2022 Global Multimedia

Primary health care: health systems, communities and the planet

 

Our planet and our health are inextricably interlinked. The air we breathe, the food we eat, the resources that we consume for livelihoods, shelter, healing and recreation all determine our quality of life and well-being.

Our existence relies on the resources and services provided by our planet, but we are dangerously close to exhausting their benefits. The consequences of unsustainable production and consumption have disturbed the balance of our environment. Climate change, more frequent and intense natural disasters, biodiversity loss and pollution are all disproportionately affecting the people who are least capable of protecting themselves. In terms of health impacts, these events increase the incidence of injuries, malnutrition, vector-borne diseases like dengue fever, and noncommunicable diseases such as asthma, chronic respiratory diseases, stroke, heart attack and many others.

Health for all can only be achieved in a healthy planet that serves everyone equitably regardless of their race, gender, age, religion ...