Contents

Contents tagged: mixed methods research

July 9, 2019 Western Pacific Publication

Using the Project INTEGRATE Framework in Practice in Central Coast, Australia

Integrated care implies sustained change in complex systems and progress is not always linear or easy to assess. The Central Coast integrated Care Program (CCICP) was planned as a ten-year place-based system change. This paper reports the first formative evaluation to provide a detailed description of the implementation of the CCICP, after two years of activity, and the current progress towards integrated care.

April 2, 2018 Africa Publication

Assessing the feasibility of community health insurance in Uganda: A mixed-methods exploratory analysis

Community health insurance (CHI) aims to provide financial protection and facilitate health care access among poor rural populations. Given common operational challenges that hamper the full development of the scheme, there is need to undertake systematic feasibility studies. These are scarce in the literature and usually they do not provide a comprehensive analysis of the local context. The present research intends to adopt a mixed-methods approach to assess ex-ante the feasibility of CHI. 

Sept. 1, 2017 Americas Publication

The new frontier of strategic alliances in health care: New partnerships under accountable care organizations

Accountable care organizations (ACOs) and similar reforms aim to improve coordination between health care providers; however, due to the fragmented nature of the US health care system, successful coordination will hinge in large part on the ability of health care organizations to successfully partner accross organizational boundaries, however, little is known about new partnerships formed under the ACO model. 

July 25, 2017 Americas Publication

The new frontier of strategic alliances in health care: New partnerships under accountable care organizations

Accountable care organizations (ACOs) and similar reforms aim to improve coordination between health care providers; however, due to the fragmented nature of the US health care system, successful cordination will hinge in large part on the ability of health care organizations to successfully partner across organizational boundaries. This article findings suggests that the success of the ACO model will hinge in large part upon the success of new partnerships, with important implications for understanding ACO readiness and capabilities, the relatively small savings achieved to date by ACO programs, and the path to providers bearing more risk for population health management.