IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

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Contents tagged: interprofessional collaboration

Nov. 18, 2020 Europe Publication

“It’s Difficult, There’s No Formula”: Qualitative Study of Stroke Related Communication Between Primary and Secondary Healthcare Professionals

The proportion of people living with stroke is growing. In England, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Guidelines for stroke recommend that a person with suspected or confirmed stroke event is admitted to a specialist stroke unit, in order to receive required treatment promptly. Stroke rehabilitation follows, which involves providing stroke survivors with support and treatment from a multidisciplinary rehabilitation team. Stroke survivors’ transition from acute settings to rehabilitation can take place either in hospital, at home or the community.

One model of care is Early Supported Discharge (ESD), which offers community-based health and social care as an alternative to inpatient care. NICE recommend that transfers of care from hospital to community should include all pertinent health and social care information, given to relevant health and social care professionals and patients promptly.Long-term care led by generalists in the community is recommended and stroke survivors are encouraged to ...

June 20, 2019 Europe Publication

Implications of interprofessional primary care team characteristics for health services and patient health outcomes: A systematic review with narrative synthesis

Interprofessional primary care (IPPC) teams are promoted as an alternative to single profession physician practices in primary care with focus on preventive care and chronic disease management. Characteristics of teams can have an impact on their performance.

However, the empirical evidence of the implications of IPPC team design on various aspects of care processes or health outcomes is specific to particular contexts, but a general understanding of optimal team design is not available.

Nov. 6, 2017 Europe Publication

Professional groups driving change toward patient-centred care: interprofessional working in stroke rehabilitation in Denmark

Patient-centred care based on needs has been gaining momentum in health policy and the workforce. This creates new demand for interprofessional teams and redefining roles and tasks of professionals, yet little is known on how to improve new health policies more effectively. Their aim was to analyse the role and capacity of healht professions in driving organisational change in interprofessional working and patient-centred care.

Aug. 17, 2016 Africa Practice

Creating a sustainable model of spine care in underserved communities in Botswana

As identified in the Global Burden of Disease report (2012), spine disorders present an enormous burden on individuals, their families, communities and societies and are the leading cause of disability worldwide. In Botswana, the burden of low back pain has been estimated to be the 5th leading cause of disability adjusted life years (DALYS) in 2013 and neck and back pain combined is ranked as the number 1 cause of years lived with disability (YLDs), increasing from the third position in 1990 to the first position in 2013.  In the developing world the burden of spine disorders is expected to be higher than in high income countries; there is a critical lack of access to patient-centred, evidence based spine care in low income countries due to poor prioritization and integration of spine services and lack of available trained health workforce to manage these conditions.

Visionary leadership and reaching out ...