Contents

Contents tagged: governmentality

Sept. 14, 2018 Africa Publication

Public–private partnerships in practice: collaborating to improve health finance policy in Ghana and Kenya

Social health insurance (SHI), one mechanism for achieving universal health coverage, has become increasingly important in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as they work to achieve this goal. Although small private providers supply a significant proportion of healthcare in LMICs, integrating these providers into SHI systems is often challenging. Public–private partnerships in health are one way to address these challenges, but we know little about how these collaborations work, how effectively, and why. 

July 27, 2018 Africa Publication

Priority setting for health in the context of devolution in Kenya: implications for health equity and community-based primary care

Devolution changes the locus of power within a country from central to sub-national levels. In 2013, Kenya devolved health and other services from central government to 47 new sub-national governments (known as counties). This transition seeks to strengthen democracy and accountability, increase community participation, improve efficiency and reduce inequities. With changing responsibilities and power following devolution reforms, comes the need for priority-setting at the new county level. Priority-setting arises as a consequence of the needs and demand for healthcare resources exceeding the resources available, resulting in the need for some means of choosing between competing demands

July 27, 2018 Africa Publication

Strengthening decentralized primary healthcare planning in Nigeria using a quality improvement model: how contexts and actors affect implementation

Quality improvement models have been applied across various levels of health systems with varying success leading to scepticisms about effectiveness. Health systems are complex, influenced by contexts and characterized by numerous interests. Thus, a shift in focus from examining whether improvement models work, to understanding why, when and where they work most effectively is essential

Sept. 15, 2016 Europe, Global Publication

Power and Integrated Health Care: Shifting from Governance to Governmentality

Integrated care occurs within micro, meso and macro levels of governance structures, which are shaped by complex power dynamics. Yet theoretically-led notions of power, and scrutiny of its meanings and its functioning, are neglected in the literature on integrated care. We explore an alternative approach. Following a discussion on governance, two streams of theorising power are presented: mainstream and second-stream. Mainstream concepts are based on the notion of power-as-capacity, of one agent ­having the capacity to influence another—so the overall idea is ‘power over ’. Studies on integrated care ­typically employ mainstream ideas, which yield rather limited analyses. Second-stream concepts focus on ­strategies and relations of power—how it is channelled, negotiated and (re)produced. These notions align well with the contemporary shift away from the idea that power is centralised, towards more fluid ideas of power as dispersed and (re)negotiated throughout a range of societal structures, networks and ...