IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: peer support

Oct. 4, 2017 Europe, Global Event

WEBINAR Integrated Care Matters Series 2- Preventing and Managing Frailty

The International Foundation for Integrated Care is delighted to introduce the 2nd series of webinars on people-centred integrated care in practice. This series will have a particular focus on active and healthy ageing and preventing and managing frailty. The webinars will be hosted by IFIC Scotland in collaboration with the University of the West of Scotland, the Institute of Research and Innovation in Social Services, and the Health and Social Care Alliance.  Each monthly webinar will feature health and care practitioners from Scotland in conversation with colleagues from across the World and with insights from people who currently use health and social care support. All of our ‘Home and Away’ presenters have experience of implementing people-centred integrated care for older people and will offer practical tips and peer support as part of IFIC’s global community of practice. Each webinar will extend IFIC’s on-line knowledge tree by collating information ...

March 2, 2016 Global Publication

How stakeholder participation can contribute to systematic reviews of complex interventions

Although patient and public involvement in research is a requirement for research funding in many countries, the knowledge base for how to effectively involve people —and evidence of the effectiveness of involvement—is weak. This article describes how methods used in participatory health research were used to involve patients, clients, providers and community health workers across all stages of a realist review. Sustained involvement enabled better identification of the components of the complex intervention of communitybased peer support. It also challenged assumptions of how peer support is constructed, leading the review team to question whether the process of designing and implementing interventions has more influence on effectiveness than previously recognised in empirical studies. We conclude with a discussion on when sustained involvement should be used, and the challenges of incorporating it into the traditional researcher-led approach to systematic reviews.