IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: outcomes for patients

Jan. 28, 2020 Europe Publication

Interrupted time series analyses on the effect on integrated care among the older population

Current health and social care systems in most European countries, are highly fragmented into specialist services, and poorly designed to provide health and social care for patients with multiple health problems and social needs. As some groups of patients might have greater difficulties navigating in a fragmented and divided system than others, current system also risks increasing inequalities in access and use of health and social care services. The aim of this study is to investigate if a comprehensive integrated care system perform better than ‘standard care’ in regards to emergency department visits, hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC), costs and re-admissions as well as increase equity in health care among older people.

Jan. 20, 2020 Global Publication

Suitable Scales; Rethinking Scale for Innovative Integrated Care Governance

For organising person centered care, an important issue is how to deal with scale. This addresses what to organise on what level (in the neighbourhood, local, in the region, or national). With the increasing complexity of organising integrated care in networks, scale issues are an ingredient of integrated care governance. However, there is a lack of empirical studies that treat scale as an object of study in itself. Scale is an outcome of the interplay between many different interests, values and perceptions of people involved in the broader social and political processes. Five factors for suitable scales are discussed, emphasising the relevance for integrated care governance. These factors show, that the classical micro-meso-macro thinking oversimplify reality and more knowledge about suitable scales is required.

Dec. 3, 2019 Europe Publication

Towards a theoretical framework for Integrated Team Leadership (IgTL)

This study presents a framework for the leadership of integrated, interprofessional health, and social-care teams (IgTs) based on a previous literature review and a qualitative study. The theoretical framework for Integrated Team Leadership (IgTL) is based on contributions from 15 professional and nonprofessional staff, in 8 community teams in the United Kingdom. Participants shared their perceptions of IgT’s good practice in relation to patient outcomes. There were two clear elements, Person-focused and Task-focused leadership behaviors with particular emphasis on the facilitation of shared professional practices. Person-focused leadership skills include: inspiring and motivating; walking the talk; change and innovation; consideration; empowerment, teambuilding and team maintenance; and emotional intelligence.

Nov. 26, 2019 Americas Publication

Association of the Implementation of the Patient-Centered Medical Home with Quality of Life in Patients with Multimorbidity

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has clinical benefits for chronic disease care, but the association with patient-reported outcomes such as health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is unexplored in patients with multimorbidity (two or more chronic diseases). The aim o this study was to examine if greater clinic-level PCMH implementation was associated with higher HRQoL in multimorbid adults.

Sept. 17, 2019 Europe Publication

Connected Health Services: Framework for an Impact Assessment

Connected health (CH), as a new paradigm, manages individual and community health in a holistic manner by leveraging a variety of technologies and has the potential for the incorporation of telehealth and integrated care services, covering the whole spectrum of health-related services addressing healthy subjects and chronic patients. The reorganization of services around the person or citizen has been expected to bring high impact in the health care domain. There are a series of concerns (eg, contextual factors influencing the impact of care models, the cost savings associated with CH solutions, and the sustainability of the CH ecosystem) that should be better addressed for CH technologies to reach stakeholders more successfully. Overall, there is a need to effectively establish an understanding of the concepts of CH impact. As services based on CH technologies go beyond standard clinical interventions and assessments of medical devices or medical treatments, the need for standardization ...

June 27, 2019 Global Publication

The impact of a comprehensive electronic patient portal on the health service use: an interrupted time-series analysis

EPPs hold promise for reducing hospital readmissions. Certain patient populations with chronic conditions may differentially benefit from portal use depending on their needs for communication with their providers.
However, there is little empirical research on the potential benefit that electronic patient portals (EPP) can have on the care quality and health outcomes of diverse multi-ethnic international populations. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which an EPP was associated with improvements in health service use.

July 3, 2018 Americas, Western Pacific Publication

Lessons for achieving health equity comparing Aotearoa/New Zealand and the United States

Aotearoa/New Zealand (Aotearoa/NZ) and the United States (U.S.) suffer inequities in health outcomes by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. This paper compares both countries’ approaches to health equity to inform policy efforts. They developed a conceptual model that highlights how government and private policies influence health equity by impacting the healthcare system (access to care, structure and quality of care, payment of care), and integration of healthcare system with social services

Dec. 12, 2016 Global Publication

From vision to action. Making patient-centred care a reality

The NHS have worked with The King´s Fund to translate their themes into outcomes for patients and set out the most important priorities for action to achieve these outcomes. Under each of their five themes: 

- Co-ordinated care

- Patients engaged decisions about their care

- Supported self-management

- Prevention, early diagnosis and intervention

- Emotional, psychological and practical support

they have described the outcomes that they most want to achieve for patients. In order to achieve these outcomes, they hace then selected the service improvements that, if met, will have a major impact on the quality and cost-effectiveness of care.