IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: multisectoral collaboration

Sept. 6, 2019 Global Publication

Health in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: from framework to action, transforming challenges into opportunities

The clock is ticking and just a little more than 10 years remain to meet the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Enhanced political and public awareness, inter- and transdisciplinary engagement, new partnerships, and multisectoral collaborations are required to foster knowledge-and-action societies in order to tackle the complex issues that are inherent to sustainable development. A one-day symposium held in Basel, Switzerland, in November 2018 offered a venue for open exchange on how to stimulate dialogue for co-creating innovative ideas and scalable action to address some of the most pressing challenges of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

June 2, 2016 Europe Event

Multi-specialty community providers and primary and acute care systems

The primary and acute care systems (PACS) model and multi-specialty community provider (MCP) model are particularly focussed on building partnerships between GP, hospital, community and mental health care organisations to build a health care system to meet their local population’s health needs.

This Conference will take a detailed look at each of these models of care. One year on from the launch of the PACS and MCP vanguard sites, it will provide an opportunity to hear from the sites and others on how are they working in practice with lessons for areas of the United Kingdom that are interested in implementing similar models for their local populations. 

Programme:

Multi-specialty community providers and primary and acute care systems

Speakers

Registration

April 20, 2016 Europe Publication

National Framework for Children and Young People’s Continuing Care

This Framework (reviewed) is intended to provide guidance for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) when assessing the needs of children and young people whose complex needs cannot be met by universal or specialist health services. CCGs have a legal responsibility for securing to a reasonable extent the health care which an individual needs, and this guidance is about the process which should be followed for the equitable discharge of that responsibility for children and young people with complex needs. This revision takes account of the new structures of NHS commissioning created by the Health and Social Care Act 2012 and the new integrated approach to the commissioning of services for children and young people with special educational need or disability (SEND) which the Children and Families Act 2014 introduced. In particular, where a child or young person has a SEND, which will often be the case, then CCGs and local authorities ...