IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: information technology

Nov. 8, 2020 Europe Publication

F@ce: a team-based, person-centred intervention for rehabilitation after stroke supported by information and communication technology – a feasibility study

Despite encouraging data about declining stroke incidence, on a global level the aging population and accumulating risk factors contribute to an increasing lifetime risk of stroke. Per the Global Burden of Disease 2016 Lifetime Risk of Stroke Collaborators, the mean global lifetime risk of stroke increased from 22.8% in 1990 to 24.9% in 2016, a relative increase of 8.9% (95% CI, 6.2%–11.5%) after accounting for the competing risk of death of any cause other than stroke.

Globally, there is a growing use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), including mobile phones, tablets and computers, which are being integrated into people’s daily activities. An ICT-based intervention called F@ce was developed in order to provide a structure for the process in stroke rehabilitation and facilitate change by integrating a global problem-solving strategy using SMS alerts. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ...

Sept. 29, 2017 Europe Publication

Digital Technologies Supporting Person-Centered Integrated Care – A Perspective

Shared electronic health and social care records in some service systems are already showing some of the benefits of digital technology and digital data for integrating health and social care. These records are one example of the beginning "digitalisation" of services that gives a glimpse of the potential of digital technology and systems for building coordinate and individualized care. 

June 14, 2017 Americas Publication

The role of informatics in patient-centered care and personalized medicine

This article covers the critical role that laboratory information systems, electronic medical records, and digital imaging plays in patient-centered personalized medicine. The value of integrated diagnostic reports, clinical decision support, and the use of whole-slide imaging to better evaluate cytology samples destined for molecular testing is discussed. This article also highlights the barriers to the widespread adoption ot these disruptive technologies due to regulatory obstacles, limited commercial solutions, poor interoperability, andlack of standardization.