IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: care guidelines

Oct. 4, 2016 Europe Practice

Developing guidelines to reduce under-five child mortality in the Republic of Moldova

The government developed an under-five child mortality reduction initiative and established new standards and protocols for the observation of childhood illness; research conducted prior to the initiative identified the root causes of problems and provided evidence of the need to act; guidance and support from the Ministry of Health led to coordinated intersectoral action Educating and expanding providers’ competencies challenged pre-held attitudes regarding the detection and treatment of childhood illness; joint-sector delivery by health providers and social workers facilitated more comprehensive and coordinated care for patients; national ownership over the initiative was important; activities were fully integrated into national standards and supported with legislation.

Sept. 7, 2016 Europe Practice

Introducing evidence-based guidelines through a best practice accreditation programme to improve care quality in Spain

The Best Practice Spotlight Organization accreditation model (developed by the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario in Canada) was rolled out in Spain to encourage care organizations to improve adherence to best practice guidelines; while the initiative activated a well-established and structured programme model, flexibility in implementation supported the tailoring of new practices to local needs; providers were given lead roles in implementing the accreditation programme within their respective organizations, providing them with ownership over the initiative and increasing their acceptance of new practices; a focus on generating and comparing data, as well as strengthening the evaluation of care practices, motivated performance improvements.

Sept. 7, 2016 Europe Practice

Developing a national cancer plan to coordinate the fight against cancer in Luxembourg

A national cancer plan was developed by the Ministry of Health to unite current services and coordinate the fight against cancer; ten priority areas for action were identified by the initiative: governance, health promotion, prevention, screening, diagnostics, treatment, rehabilitation, resources, patients’ rights and research; strong government commitment was essential for realizing a coordinated national approach; involving a diverse range of stakeholders from the beginning helped to guide the initiative; implementation of the national cancer plan is still in the early phases and any improvements will take time to observe.

Sept. 7, 2016 Europe Practice

Strengthening diabetes service delivery at the primary care level in Iceland

Following grassroots efforts to increase the role of primary care providers in managing patients with diabetes, formal clinical guidelines to support diabetes care delivery at the primary level were published in 2009. The delivery of diabetes-related care in primary settings is increasing as a result; knowledge gained through experiences working abroad provided inspiration for the initiative and fostered local innovation; informal discussions among providers had sufficient power to initially motivate and direct change; incorporating trainings for providers into the formal education system helped to establish a new standard of care and ensured sustainability of knowledge.

Sept. 6, 2016 Europe Practice

Strengthening prenatal and obstetric care in Belarus

Improving maternal and child health was established as a key government priority. Strong top-down support for change reinforced by legislation provided a guiding framework for transformations; Investigation into key challenges leading to a strong understanding of root causes ensured health reforms responded to needs; prenatal screening recommendations were developed and changes to resource distribution, provider training and incentives were implemented to promote uptake and adherence to new guidelines; financial incentives for patients helped encourage desired participation in prenatal care by women; service delivery reforms took time and adoption of a long-term vision was needed.