IPCHS. Integrated People-Centred Health Services

Contents

Contents tagged: creating an enabling environment

Nov. 13, 2020 Europe Publication

Collaborative Experience Success Stories in Integrated Care of Older People: A Narrative Analysis

With the increasing differentiation of organisations involved in the pursuit of public health, there is also a growing need for inter?organisational integration. Starting from the concepts of differentiation and integration, this article is attempting a theoretical reconstruction based on published research on inter?organisational integration in public health and related welfare services.

The call for integrated care has been induced by demographic change, increased fragmentation of the welfare sector and increased demand for technically and more expensive care solutions. There is a wide variety of strategies and initiatives to improve care continuity and coordination for people with chronic diseases, not least for older people with complex care needs who require care from multiple providers.

Inter-organisational collaboration is crucial in the care of older people, as is the development of integrated care. Storytelling in organisations is one way of understanding how to achieve successful collaboration. This article provides insights into ...

Dec. 3, 2019 Eastern Mediterranean Publication

Care coordination in the health-care service delivery: an elderly care perspective

The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between patient-centricity, care coordination and delivery of quality care for older people with multiple chronic conditions. Care coordination is defined as a process where physicians, nurses and allied professionals work together to clarify responsibilities, care objectives, treatment plans and discharge plans for delivery of unified care. Patient-centricity is defined as an approach of delivering quality care to patients that focuses on creating a positive experience for them.

Oct. 3, 2019 Europe Publication

The evolution of family-centered care: From supporting parent-delivered interventions to a model of family integrated care

There is increasing recognition that parents play a critical role in promoting the health outcomes of low birthweight and preterm infants. Despite a large body of literature on interventions and models to support family engagement in infant care, parent involvement in the delivery of care for such infants is still restricted in many neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This article proposes a taxonomy for classifying parent-focused NICU interventions and parent-partnered care models to aid researchers, clinical teams, and health systems to evaluate existing and future approaches to care. The proposed framework has three levels: interventions to support parents, parent-delivered interventions, and multidimensional models of NICU care that explicitly incorporate parents and partners in the care of their preterm or low birthweight infant.