Contents

Contents tagged: chronic diseases

Oct. 19, 2019 Europe Publication

From protocolized to person-centered chronic care in general practice: study protocol of an action-based research project (COPILOT)

The management of people with multiple chronic diseases challenges health care systems designed around single disease. Patients with multimorbidity often receive highly fragmented care that may lead to inefficient, ineffective and potentially harmful treatments and neglect of essential health needs. A more comprehensive, person-centered approach is advocated for persons with multiple morbidities. However, examples on how to provide more person-centered care and evidence of its impact are scarce.
The aim of this study was to develop a proactive person-centered care approach for persons with (multiple) chronic diseases in general practice, and to explore the impact on ‘Quadruple aims’: experiences of patients and professionals, patient outcomes and costs of resources use.

Oct. 4, 2019 Global Multimedia

How to adapt person-centered health services to ageing populations?

Every older person, everywhere, should have access to high quality and person-centred health services. That's why the World Health Organization has published guidelines on Integrated Care for Older People.

Learn more here: https://www.who.int/ageing/health-systems/icope/en/ and here: https://www.who.int/ageing/publications/guidelines-icope/en/

Populations around the world are rapidly ageing. It will increase demand for primary health care and long-term care, require a larger and better trained health workforce and intensify the need for age-friendly environments. These investments can enable the many contributions of older people – whether it be within their family, to their local community or to society more broadly. Universal health coverage for older people means quality health services that are integrated and person-centered.

Societies that adapt to this changing demographic and invest in Healthy Ageing can enable individuals to live both longer and healthier lives and for societies to ...

Oct. 4, 2019 Americas, Global Toolkit

Integrated Care for Older People (ICOPE)

As people grow older, their health needs are likely to become more complex and chronic. However, existing health systems are fragmented and lack coordination, which makes it difficult to effectively address these needs. The WHO Integrated Care for Older People (ICOPE) package of tools offers an approach that helps key stakeholders in health and social care to understand, design, and implement a person-centred and coordinated model of care. By providing evidence-based tools and guidance specific to every level of care, ICOPE helps health systems support Healthy Ageing and maximise older people’s intrinsic capacity and functional ability.

Oct. 4, 2019 Global News

WHO launches an innovative package of tools to support person-centred and integrated care for older people

On the International Day of the Older Person (1st October) the World Health Organization (WHO) released a package of tools to support the implementation of the Integrated Care for Older People (ICOPE) approach.

ICOPE, based on the WHO Framework on integrated people-centred health services, has been developed in the context of populations around the world ageing rapidly. It enables health and long-term care systems-and the services within them-to respond optimally to the unique, varied and often complex needs of older people.

The package of tools includes: the ICOPE Implementation Framework (guidance for policy makers and programme managers to assess and measure the capacity of services and systems to deliver integrated care at the community level); the ICOPE Handbook, which describes practical care pathways to detect declines in intrinsic capacity and develop personalised care plans; and the ICOPE handbook App, which helps implement ICOPE in community care settings.

Access ICOPE tools ...

Sept. 19, 2019 Europe Publication

Care Redesign Survey: To Improve Chronic Disease Care, Change the Payment Model

Many health care organizations are reasonably effective in treating chronic diseases, but they are limited from doing better by fee-for-service payment, which remains the predominant payment model in the United States. The latest NEJM Catalyst Insights Council report serves as a snapshot in time, showing the intent of health care providers to be proactive in treating chronic disease, but limitations in their ability to address population health

Sept. 17, 2019 Europe Publication

Self-management support for chronic disease in primary care: frequency of patient self-management problems and patient reported priorities, and alignment with ultimate behavior goal selection

To enable delivery of high quality patient-centered care, as well as to allow primary care health systems to allocate appropriate resources that align with patients’ identified self-management problems (SM-Problems) and priorities (SM-Priorities), a practical, systematic method for assessing self-management needs and priorities is needed. In this current report, are present the patient reported data generated from Connection to Health (CTH), to identify the frequency of patients’ reported SM-Problems and SM-Priorities; and examine the degree of alignment between patient SM-Priorities and the ultimate Patient-Healthcare team member selected Behavioral Goal.

June 27, 2019 Global Publication

The impact of a comprehensive electronic patient portal on the health service use: an interrupted time-series analysis

EPPs hold promise for reducing hospital readmissions. Certain patient populations with chronic conditions may differentially benefit from portal use depending on their needs for communication with their providers.
However, there is little empirical research on the potential benefit that electronic patient portals (EPP) can have on the care quality and health outcomes of diverse multi-ethnic international populations. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which an EPP was associated with improvements in health service use.

July 23, 2018 South-East Asia Publication

Vertical integrated service model: an educational intervention for chronic disease management and its effects in rural China – a study protocol

Chronic diseases are becoming a huge threat to the Chinese health system. Although the New Round of Medical Reform aims to improve this, the chronic disease management in rural China is still worrying as it relies highly on hospital care instead of primary care. The vertical integrated care model has proven to be effective for chronic disease patients in many high-income countries, while few studies have been conducted in China. In this project, vertical integrated care will be applied to optimize the care of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and primary hypertension in rural China, and to shift the care from hospital to primary care.

Dec. 18, 2017 Americas Publication

Governing Collaborative Healthcare Improvement: Lessons From an Atlantic Canadian Case

The Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration for Innovation and Improvement in Chronic Disease (AHC) Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) in Eastern Canada provided an approach to spur system-level reform across multiple health systems for patients and families living with chronic disease. Developed and led by senior executives with a unique governance approach and involving clinical front-line teams, the AHC serves as a practical example of leadership creating and driving momentum for achieving success in collaborative health system improvements 

Dec. 12, 2017 Europe Publication

Defining indicators for assessing integrated care (2012-2014): Lessons learned on methodology and the evolution in assessment approach

Integrated care interventions are extremely complex as they tend to invilve multiple actors and different care levels. When evaluating such programmes indicators provide several benefits in comparison with other approaches. The Agència de Qualitat Avaluació Sanitàries de Catalunya, through a new collaborative approach, has been working on the development of indicators specially aimed at assesing integrated care. The aim of this study was to present the methodology developed and review the evolution of the prioritized indicators in three different projects aimed at assessing chronic integrated care initiatives.